Drayton Park Golf Club

History

The club, then known as "Tamworth Golf Club", was founded in October 1897 and its first home was at Glascote, Tamworth. Local residents protested at the fencing off of the land, over which they had previously had free access. The first subscription was ten shillings (50p) for gentlemen and nothing for ladies.

The club moved to land in Bonehill in 1912 and became a limited company in 1922. The number of members rapidly grew, requiring an increase in the number of holes from 9 to 18, and as the necessary land was not available at Bonehill, the club moved again to its present location in 1935/36.

Situated in parkland formerly part of the Drayton Manor estate, the seat of the Peel family - of which Sir Robert Peel, the founder of the police force, was the most famous – the course was designed and set out by James Braid, five times winner of the British Open Golf Championship.

A member of the "Famous Triumvirate" of Braid, Taylor and Vardon who between them had won several British Opens, Braid also had a hand in the design of Gleneagles, Carnoustie and Royal Troon, amongst many others

The first club captain at the present course was Alderman A.E. Smith, and a trophy in his name is contested annually to this day (the A.E. Smith Foursomes). The current membership of the club is about 650 golfers (550 male / 100 female golfers).

The "Famous Triumvirate"

Known throughout the golfing world, what is the connection between them and Drayton Park GC? For the club membership it is a source of great pride that the course was the creation of James Braid.

Without doubt these three men have been as much of an influence on golf as any other group of people during the history of the game and at Drayton we are still able to reap the rewards of a master course designer.





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